Zero Tolerance at School – No Religious Art Permitted

I read an article earlier today on FoxNews.com concerning a high school student who received a failing grade on an art project because it included a Bible reference. For the project, students were asked to draw a landscape. It looks like all of the pieces were charcoal works and one of the students included a Bible reference – simply John 3:16 – in the piece.

At the beginning of the semester, students were required to sign a policy that prohibited creation of any art that included violence, blood, sexual connotations or reference religious beliefs. The students lawsuit indicates that Julie Millin, the teacher, told the student that he had signed away his Constitutional rights by signing the agreement. I hardly think a high school student can sign away Constitutional rights even if he was older than 18. Is that even legal? Can you sign away rights that are inalienable?

From FoxNews.com:

MADISON, Wis. — A Tomah High School student has filed a federal lawsuit alleging his art teacher censored his drawing because it featured a cross and a biblical reference.

The lawsuit alleges other students were allowed to draw “demonic” images and asks a judge to declare a class policy prohibiting religion in art unconstitutional.

Michelle Malkin has taken the story a step beyond FoxNews by posting images that received a passing grade plus the image that did not pass. The images that passed seemed to be portraits of demon-like creatures. Interesting huh?

Granted, it sounds like the student may have been a bit rude after creating the piece and recieving the grade – he even tore up the student policy in front of Millin – but that’s no excuse for a state run school to restrict religious expression.

This is just one more reason to get government completely out of the education business.

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