United Against The Porkapalooza … for what its worth.

Well House Republicans stood strong against the Porkapalooza that will saddle my children with an unbearable burden they don’t deserve. $800 billion to a trillion dollars (with interest) and that’s just this year and doesn’t count TARP or SON OF TARP. $3 trillion I heard. I’ve lost track. I will find some links to help out on this. But for now … her are your House leaders who tried mightily to create jobs at a lower cost and … Democrat or Republican … were actually looking out for your children and their children. Lord help us when they get the bill.

Update: OK … Instapundit has some nice links.But here’s a portion of the AP story.

Told that no Republican backed the measure, White House press secretary Robert Gibbs reacted by citing another number: “3.5 million jobs that we look forward to saving or creating.”

That’s my favorite … save or retain. It’s the oldest economiuc development scam in the books. The article continues with the sad part.

Republicans said the package won’t work because it has too little in tax cuts and spreads too much money around to everyday projects like computer upgrades for federal agencies.

“This legislation falls woefully short,” said House GOP Leader John Boehner of Ohio. “With a price tag of more than $1 trillion when you factor in interest, it costs every family almost $10,000 in added debt. This is an act of generational theft that our children and grandchildren will be paying for far into the future.”

Hey you young Democrats for Obama … you pay for this too. Well, umm, actually you guys don’t pay … I forgot.

5 replies
  1. davis
    davis says:

    Personally, Jim, I look lovingly at the deficit I am already paying for Pres. Bushes policies. But then, those deficits are good deficits, while the new ones (unbearable, no less) are bad deficits. The bill has passed and Pres. Obama is going to sign it. You can stop whining.

  2. gillie28
    gillie28 says:

    Winners

     

    High-speed and inner-city rail: Went from $300 million in House bill to $2.25 billion in Senate to $8 billion in final version. There also is a $6.9 billion provision for public transit.

     

    Amtrak: Picked up $500 million from both House and Senate versions to total $1.3 billion. The bill stipulates that no more than 60 percent can go to the Northeast Corridor.

     

    National Institutes of Health: Ends up with $10 billion in the final bill. The House proposed $3.5 billion and the Senate wanted $10 billion — $8.2 billion goes to the NIH director for his discretion.

     

    Government oversight: Board to oversee stimulus bill spending will get $84 million to do the job. House bill allocated $14 million while the Senate bill called for $7 million. There is also more than $100 million more for various inspectors general in different agencies.

     

    NASA: Banked just more than $2 billion, including $400,000 for science/global-warming research. Watch congressional comments on the stimulus bill »

  3. gillie28
    gillie28 says:

    Losers

     

    Veterans: Nearly all items for Veterans Affairs were reduced and the $2 billion the Senate wanted for VA construction was wiped out altogether. The VA did get one thing: $1 billion for medical facilities renovation and retooling.

     

    Military construction: Cut and put into a general pot, a change from targeted money for each branch of the services. Army construction alone went from $600 million in the Senate and $900 million in the House to $180 million in the final bill. But negotiators compromised over a general military construction fund — the House wanted $3.75 billion while the Senate allocated $118 million and settled on $1.45 billion for all services.

     

    FBI: Senate had allocated $475 million but all was cut out of final bill.

    Survivors

     

    Pandemic flu research: Although senators agreed it wouldn't produce jobs, it's getting $50 million in the final bill, down from nearly $900 million. Watch the latest on the stimulus bill »

    Damage control

     

    Foreclosures: $2 billion is set for a neighborhood stabilization program that helps areas plagued with foreclosures by buying back properties and preventing blight.

     

    Homeless: $1.5 billion is directed to homelessness prevention.

     

    Passports: $90 million is going to the State Department to deal with domestic facilities that deal with passports and training.

     

    Social Security: $500 million goes to replace its 30-year-old computer system.

    Tax breaks

     

    Car buyers: Anyone who buys a new car in 2009 gets to deduct the sales tax. To qualify, buyer must make less than $125,000 individually or $250,000 jointly. Cost is $1.7 billion.

     

    Homebuyers: First-time homebuyers who purchase this calendar year get an $8,000 tax credit which does not have to be repaid like a similar measure last year. This phases out for people making more than $75,000 individually or $150,000 jointly. "First-time homebuyer" is defined as someone who has not owned a home for the past three years. Cost: $6.63 billion.

    Paying for college

     

    Pell grants: will increase to a maximum of $5,350 per student in 2009-2010 year thanks to two provisions in the stimulus.

     

    Tax credits: Individuals making less than $80,000 or families making less than $160,000 can get up to $2,500 in tax credits for college tuition. 40 percent ($1,000) of the credit is refundable. Cost: $13.9 billion over 10 years.

    Making work pay

     

    Tax credits: Anyone making $75,000 individually or $150,000 as a family will get refundable tax credit up to $400 per person or $800 per family.

  4. gillie28
    gillie28 says:

    Losers

     

    Veterans: Nearly all items for Veterans Affairs were reduced and the $2 billion the Senate wanted for VA construction was wiped out altogether. The VA did get one thing: $1 billion for medical facilities renovation and retooling.

     

    Military construction: Cut and put into a general pot, a change from targeted money for each branch of the services. Army construction alone went from $600 million in the Senate and $900 million in the House to $180 million in the final bill. But negotiators compromised over a general military construction fund — the House wanted $3.75 billion while the Senate allocated $118 million and settled on $1.45 billion for all services.

     

    FBI: Senate had allocated $475 million but all was cut out of final bill.

  5. Dimsdale
    Dimsdale says:

    Now, now, gillie, you have to stop "whining!"  Despite the fact of what you wrote is probably a surprise to the vast majority of the numbskulls that signed onto this bill.   That, and about 1400 other pages of this crap sandwich.  But let us stop "whining" and soldier on.  Or better yet, lying back and thinking of England…..

    Nero fiddled alone.  Obama will have a full orchestra backing him up.

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